“But it’s just not possible for me.” – Steps I took to make full time travel with family my reality.

Does this thought sound familiar? “I would love that, but it’s just not possible for me.”
It sure occupied my mind a year ago, when I first thought of travelling long-term. As a coach, I believe in making dreams come true. And often times those dreams are actually closer than you think. Here are some steps I took to make my vision of travelling full time with my family reality

Finding examples of people doing what I want to do.

A year ago I didn’t even know there were families out there travelling the world full time. It sounds silly to me now, as I am currently surrounded by an awesome virtual community of people doing just that, but back then I didn’t even know that it is actually an option.

They can only do it because…(of something I don’t have)

I admit after reading about families who were travelling the world, I thought, they can only do it because they have the better job, the better family relationship, the better options, … they have all kinds of things I don’t have.
My mind came up will all kinds of reasons to believe that others can only do it because of something I believed was not my reality.
So I realised I needed to shift my perspective.

Broadening my perspective

I found blogs of a family travelling fulltime with six kids, of Black old lesbians travelling the world, of a single mom working from home while homeschooling, of people starting a new business completely out of their usual field, by self-learning new skills. Soon enough my perspective of what was possible broadened immensely, and I started to believe: If they can do it, so can I.

Surround yourself with people that inspire you and believe in you.

Chances are, your immediate friends or family might not support your desires.
So start surrounding yourself with people who do what you want to do.
Reach out to people, start conversations, ask questions. Learn about all kinds of different ways of doing things. This can happen personally or virtually. Facebook groups, for example, have become an incredible resource for connecting with people that strive for similar things and who are totally wanting to support you. It doesn’t have to be people who are exactly like you or who do exactly what you do, but people who believe in achieving their goals, in finding ways to do things outside the box.
I still have not found another queer family travelling the world, but I get so much inspiration from the diversity of people with and without kids travelling in all kinds of ways.

Make the decision.

“But how can I actually do this?” I still was not exactly sure how we could really make this happen as a family. There might still be a lot of “but”’s coming up. But I told myself that that’s ok.
I don’t have to figure this out all at once. It is a step by step process. And the first step is a decision. I decided that leaving home and travelling was my goal.

How would I do things differently, if I knew I will pursue this?

Once I decided that travelling long-term is my goal, the questions shifted. Rather than questioning if it will ever be possible for me to achieve this, I asked myself: Ok, I decided to achieve this, so what is the next step I can take today?

For example, I stopped buying new things. My standard became: I will only get it if it is useful for our trip to Thailand. At that point, we hadn’t even bought tickets yet, but it was an accessible step I could take, without having figured out other details of going on a world trip.
I was also able to let go of conflicts, because I knew, as I had made the decision to leave, that they would become obsolete. I no longer worried about my kid’s daycare situation, no longer cared about annoying neighbours.

Evolving step by step. Trusting in the process.

A year ago I did not even think about travelling the world! I did, however, think about leaving Berlin, I did research homes on the outskirts of Berlin, I did wonder about what place abroad I could imagine living in as a family. Yet with any option I considered there was always a but. But what about closeness to our friends, what about day care, what about finances,…
After a rather challenging winter in Berlin, I was able to open myself up to the possibility of travelling with my family.  I did it out if necessity because I knew as a family we needed a change. People call us brave, yet for us, it became the next logical and suddenly accessible step to start a world travel.
I acknowledge that it’s a step by step process and that bumps in my initial plans that lead me to even better possibilities than I could think of a year ago.
I learned to trust in the process.

We do not have this all figured out. While we have had amazing times in our first five weeks of travelling, there is still so much we are learning along the way. I still get stressed out. And as I am writing this my child is sick again with a strong cough and fever.
Yet not for a second does any one of us regret having left. With each experience we make on our travels we get more clear on what we want. With each new family, I meet on travels or on the web new possibilities open up for us.
As I am actually travelling with my family, and turned my dream into reality, and I recognise that it’s only the beginning of an amazing journey.

How does this relate to you?

Do you have an idea or a desire, you would love to pursue, but you think: “It’s just not possible for me?”
If there is one thing I learned it’s that it all starts with a shift in your perspective. So maybe you feel inspired to follow some of the steps outlined above, and see what difference they can make in your perspective and your reality.

If you want to read another real life story of a client, who transformed her seemingly stuck relationship with her mother, check out this post from “Inside the coaching practice.”

If you would like my support in achieving your goals, check out my coaching offer for July.

I would love to hear from you in the comments, what dreams you want to make true, and also of things that are now part of your life, that once seemed impossible.